100th blog post!

100th post

Shortly before starting my small business Amanda Jane Textiles in Autumn 2014, I began this blog. Thus far, I have written 100 blog posts and included a 30-second video about my creative life. Click here to see it.

There have been about 13,000 hits on this website. Thank you for visiting.

The plan is to write original content each week which I hope you will enjoy, and also to give access to my gradually increasing selection of quilt and sewing patterns, to my stock of fabric designs and to information about our holiday house let in Durham, UK. I’ve created links to all of these: you should be able to see them either below, or to the right of the current post(s).

Over the two and a half year period, I have covered a variety of topics, the majority (but not all) textile-related. I also like to feature the beautiful North-East of England, where I live, and also to write about other things that have caught my interest.  Here are some examples. Just click on the title to read the post:

Textiles:

Three upcycled dresses in three days

Tantalising quilt link at Beamish

Stitches and Sequins

How-to:

Save money, recycle a shirt 

A Harris tweed brooch

How to layer up a quilt

Textile artists:

Meeting Michael Brennand-Wood

Lou Gardiner in London

Sue Dove in Harrogate

Small business:

Developing textile products for sale

Running a small business

Taking photographs of products

Skiing and Snow:

Skiing and silk (what to wear for skiing)

Springtime and Snow

Durham and the North-East:

Finding inspiration on foot

Lumiere lights Durham

Durham Surprises

I also wrote a useful post about how to replace a jacket lining which appeared on the Bernina blog. Click here to see it.

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If you enjoy these posts, then do consider subscribing so you get the weekly blog-post delivered direct to your email in-box. And please pass on the website address (http://www.amandajanetextiles.com) to anyone else you know who would like it too. Thanks!

And as a special gift to mark the 100th blog post: there’s a free single-bed quilt pattern for you! Click here to get it.

The best birthday cake ever

Photo taken from blog post Fire and Ice (and Meringue).

 

Finding design inspiration on foot

The village in County Durham where I live is a former pit village with mostly slate-roofed red-brick houses. A ring of such villages circles the city of Durham. Ours is in a nice setting, with the moor rising up behind the village to the south, so you can glimpse green hills and trees from most places in the village.  As I have mentioned before (click here to see), there are lovely walks in different directions across county Durham just a few steps from our door.  Visitors to our AirBnB house (which is over the road from my home) are always surprised and pleased when they take the time to try out the railway paths. These paths have been created from the network of railway lines that existed when the pits were open, and they are well used by walkers, cyclists and horse riders.

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Last weekend, we walked a nine-mile section of the path, ending up in the village of Lanchester.  The autumn light made the colours particularly sharp and clear. These ferns, for example, almost look like flames in a fire.

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These browns and golds would make a great print, I think.

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Lots of yellow in these fallen leaves, which only stay this bright yellow for a short time.

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I like the shape of these leaves too.

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The pink, the white and the pale green of the different stages of the cow parsley stand out against the green background.

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This could develop into quite a delicate print. I remember using cow parsley for a screen-printed image when I was at college.

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The few leaves left on this branch were in such a pretty arrangement – I definitely want to draw them.

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Even though this is October in the North-East of England, we didn’t get soaked. There was a short period of very light rain, which gave us this glorious sight towards the end of our walk.

So, a good walk and some sketchbook pages ready for transformation into textile designs.