Decorative Mending 2

This is a follow-on from last week’s post, which celebrated the kind of mending which is necessary, but which can be decorative too, in the tradition of Japanese ‘Boro’ (click here to see that post).

This is a much-loved dressing-gown, which I found many moons ago in T.K. Maxx (a store which offers ‘top brands’ at discounted prices). Frequently, there is just a single item of any one particular style. This was possibly from a French company.  It’s a woven cotton. double-layered garment with a jacquard weave: on the outside it is black with a design of white roses and on the inside there is an integral white cotton layer, formed by the white threads.  It’s very comfortable to wear. In addition, there are some design features that I like. There are two patch pockets on the front (so I can put my watch in one, instead of leaving it on the side of the bath!).  Also, there are two different sets of belt-carriers on each side, one above the other: this means for a tall girl like myself, I can thread through the fabric belt at a height that is perfect for me. So… a garment worth preserving.

gown before

gown rip

On the centre-back a hole appeared in the outside black layer, so the white layer underneath was showing through.  Bearing the ‘stitch in time saves nine’ proverb in mind, I decided to do something about it, before the tear got any bigger.  I tried out a few different black, white and grey fabrics as possible candidates for a patch over the hole, but in the end chose a black fabric with a vibrant fuchsia-pink flower on.  This patch is meant to be there.

gown after

gown close-up.jpg

I used running stitches, made with two strands of stranded cotton, in the Boro style and finished the edge with herringbone stitches in the same thread.  While I was about it, I also top-stitched the fold-back cuffs on the sleeves, so that they will stay folded-back in wear.

My final bit of decorative mending involves my ski trousers. I had a great ski trip last year with members of my family. This photo was taken in the mountains high above Andermatt, in Switzerland.

DSC_0255

At some point on that trip, I tore a hole towards the bottom of one of the trouser legs.

rip in trousers.jpg

 

In a local supermarket, I found a small Edelweiss patch. It was intended to be ironed on, but the waterproof finish of the trousers resisted this treatment, so I stitched it on with white thread and sprayed the area with waterproof spray to keep it as watertight as possible.

edelweiss (2).jpg

 

I haven’t managed any skiing this year (in spite of there having been heavy snowfalls here in the North-East of England), but who knows what next year will bring?  At least my gear is ‘ski-ready’. By the way, my post ‘Skiing and Silk’, on what to wear for ski holidays was my most popular ever; you can find it here.

My love of skiing creeps into my designing, too. This is ‘Ski Chalet’ fabric which you can find here

Ski chalet

 

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